Articles
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The Problem with Radicalization (by Douglas Weeks)

Monday, May 30th, 2016

The advent of ‘new terrorism’ studies that began in the 1970’s remains as robust as ever. Exacerbated by 9/11, 3/11, 7/7, the Arab Spring, the rise of the Islamic State, the two Paris attacks, and more recently the San Bernardino attack to name but a few, terrorism research is here to stay. Couched under the banner of Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) governments around the globe have sought to manage risk and build resilience through securitization and engagement. Convinced that radicalization is the ultimate evil, an enormous amount of research has focused on radicalization and ‘Islamic radicalization’ in particular. However, despite years of research, what is known about radicalization is defined more by what it is not rather than what it is.

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Security, Social Media and Encryption (by Joseph Campos)

Monday, May 30th, 2016

The November 13, 2015 attacks in Paris, France that killed 150 people and wounded more than 350, and the San Bernardino, U.S. on December 2, 2015, that killed 14 people, raise questions as to the conflation of security and democratic principles, especially that of privacy. Smart phones and other devices have an array of applications/tools that enable users to encrypt various forms of communication. The question for the security apparatus in democratic societies is how do we continue to promote ideals of freedom and privacy while ensuring security.

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Anonymous (Analysis by Robert Runnels)

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

Group Name: Anonymous

Principal Ideology: Freedom of speech and non-censorship

Area of Operation: Worldwide

Leadership: Constantly shifting coalition of like-minded participants, shaped by current hot issues

Affiliated Groups: Affiliations change based on the targets of the collective, however anarchist affiliations are common

Principal Enemy: Organizations and individuals who seek to restrict freedom of speech, particularly on the Internet

Tactics: Internet “hacktivism”


Anonymous is an Internet-based collective with members worldwide. Essentially, all a person needs to do to join Anonymous is to join in their online activities. The group uses the Internet as a medium for communication and coordination for its actions. These actions have included Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (DDoS) on such disparate targets as Stratfor, the Motion Picture Association of America, the Church of Scientology, Paypal, Bank of America and various law enforcement organizations. The group gains its collective power from the participation and acts of individual participants.[1]   The group is largely associated with Internet “hacktivism.” Hacktivism is a fairly controversial term. The Oxford online dictionary defines a hacktivist as a “computer hacker whose activity is aimed at promoting a social or political cause.”[2]

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